Working from home - creating value with lesser footprint


I have been thinking about work. Work is the processing of creating value for society and in return, the worker gets remunerated for the value he or she creates. But in cities, many people travel to office for "work". Work becomes a routine to appear somewhere else. They don't necessary give their best because work is not always motivating. They may not like their bosses, their team or even the work they do.

I am clearer now after observing working styles across Europe, China, Australia, Taiwan and Singapore. People appear to be self motivated when they commit time to work on things they love to do. While this is simple, it's often underrated. Working on something you love creates unspeakable value for yourself - as you created, you have fun. No amount of money can replace this feeling. Bosses and workers are equally responsible for ensuring workers love their work. Without joy, they will come to office late, they will be unhappy every night and look forward to the weekends. This is definitely not what man is made for.

Neither do I advocate that everyone takes on online trading and blogging. Most of these are just eye catchers and don't bring in sustainable income. I'm advocating that everyone be open to take a pay cut to find work nearer to your home and to do something you like. In many circumstances, you may find that you like to bake, make clothes, host friends. Be adventurous and be honest with yourself. You can start a bakery from your home and you can start a B&B if you live in a private apartment in Singapore.

A simpler way is to initiate a pay cut to work lesser hours. Take the hours you saved to think about a new business. The new business does not have to be an online venture, it can be brick and mortar. I own a rather brick and mortar business of tailoring. Anyway, the lines between online and physical sales is blurred. Revenue collection online is now far more convenient.

I advocate that you escape from the 9 to 6 pm lifestyle. Do not work on anything that you don't enjoy. Find that spot that you love and work hard on it. This is not new at all. In the early 1960s and 1970s in Singapore, we used to do household chores for income. My mother was a tailor and my relatives sold products door to door.

Alex Lew